2022 World Illustration Awards winners announced

Last night the winners of the World Illustration Awards were crowned at a special online event hosted by acclaimed illustrator Oliver Jeffers and a host of special guest presenters. With over 5,000 entrants from 77 countries, the competition was fierce and the top winners were selected from a shortlist of 200 entries.

Divided into ten award categories, including advertising, editorial, children’s publishing, design, product and packaging, judges narrowed down promising contenders from a long list of 500 illustrations to 20 winners. category, 20 highly recommended projects, four cross-category award winners, and two overall winners who each receive a cash prize.

AOI CEO Rachel Hill said, “As the awards grow from year to year, so does the incredible quality of entries. We were thrilled to receive such a diverse mix of themes and influences from around the world, united in their fearless approach to their craft.

“It has been wonderful to celebrate so many individual styles and unique voices within the illustration community. It takes courage to trust your talent and push the boundaries of your own practice. We would like to thank participants for this year for putting their work out into the world and sharing it with us here.”

The winners will all appear in the World Illustration Awards online showcase and on the pages of a printed catalog showcasing the 200 shortlisted projects. If you would like to pick up a copy of the catalog, be sure to visit the AOI website.

But who emerged victorious? Join us as we review the remarkable work of this year’s awards, starting with the two winners.

Overall Winner of New Talent: The God of Small Things by Tara Anand

Illustrator Tara Anand triumphed in the Commercial Edition category. She also won one of the top two spots with her 10-part illustration series based on The God of Little Things by Arundhati Roy.

Speaking to AOI, Tara said: “I chose the book because of the complexity of the characters and the idea that it tells two stories, one of the characters themselves and the other of a larger political and historical storyline. I tried to explore the tenuous relationship between the two.”

Done in gouache on watercolor paper, these illustrations involved laying down thick brushstrokes to create texture. Finer detail was then added to capture the richness of the setting – Kerala, India – and to utilize the versatility of the medium.

“The illustrations are very evocative with strong compositions and look like works of art,” says judge Abel Reverter. “The colors transport you to different places and the characters communicate a lot. Each image has a strong juxtaposition of elements or characters, which makes you think more deeply about the image and what it conveys.”



The God of Little Things by Tara Anand

Professional Overall Winner: Seems wild and broken by Daniel Lievano

Colombian artist Daniel Lievano made this piece for Emergence Magazine to visually bring an audio story by David G. Haskell to life. “In the piece, Haskell takes the listener on a deep time journey through the origins and evolution of sound since the beginning of the universe,” Daniel told AOI.

Using references from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, this piece evolved into a landscape background that evoked “times of primeval nature”. Animated by a mix of digital illustrations and collage elements, Sounds Wild and Broken served as the header animation for an Emergence magazine feature on viewership, as well as social media and promotions online. line.

“This room is perfect,” said judge Elena Lacey. “I love the juxtaposition of realism and abstraction and the fantastic visualization of sound. I’m really blown away by the creativity and the execution.”

Wild and Broken Sounds by Daniel Lievano



Wild and Broken Sounds by Daniel Lievano

AOI Member Award Winner: Travel to Japan by Yuki Uebo

The lockdown has changed everyone’s perspective on life, and for Royal College of Art graduate Yuki Uebo, it has given her a new perspective on daily life in Japan. Having been unable to go abroad for the past two years, Yuki took the opportunity to travel more often inside Japan and review her culture.

Stereotypical Japanese culture, such as sumo wrestling and kimono, hadn’t featured much in his life before 2020, but now popular tourist attractions feature prominently in his personal illustrations, which were written on paper before be transferred to Adobe Fresco and Photoshop. to fine-tune the details.

Trip to Japan by Yuki Uebo



Trip to Japan by Yuki Uebo

SAILING by Dorien Brouwers



SAILING by Dorien Brouwers

SAIL is a picture book aimed at children aged four to eight and the graduate market. Written in a moment of inspiration, the book about resisting the tides and storms of life’s challenges was picked up by Hachette before being published during the pandemic. “In a way, the timing couldn’t have been better because so many kids were going through tough times,” Dorien told AOI. “SAIL is all about what we can learn and grow from these (and other) challenges.”

Done primarily in watercolor and ink combined with printing techniques such as monoprint, SAIL’s bold colors and moody textures were compiled in Photoshop.

Winner of the Innovation Award: Atmospheric Rivers by Owen Gilderseleeve

On a Spring Day was commissioned by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Working with a range of scientists from the Earth Science team, Owen was able to describe water vapor levels in the West Coast Atmospheric River in this room.

Comprised of 15 layers of hand-cut and carefully assembled colored paper, the artwork depicts these water vapor levels as well as the topography of the West Coast via small symbols relating to increased snowfall areas and floods caused by this phenomenon.

“The final artwork was framed using a deep box frame with UV filtered Plexiglas to help protect the paper over time and shipped to NASA JPL in Pasadena for display in their Earth Sciences wing,” says Owen.

Atmospheric Rivers by Owen Gilderseleeve



Atmospheric Rivers by Owen Gilderseleeve

A Spring Day by Carole Bouvier



A Spring Day by Carole Bouvier

SAA Agents Award for New Talent: A Day of Spring by Carole Bouvier

These illustrations represent Carole’s continued exploration of color and negative space. Inspired by the work of Jacqueline Ayer and Japanese engravers, she wanted to “express a feeling of nostalgia and show the beauty of simple things with a very simple and direct visual approach”.

Made with transfer monotype and stencils before being stitched and digitally enhanced, these images were part of Carole’s Masters Stage project for the MA Children’s Book Illustration at ARU. Her picture book, On A Spring Day, is told in images and haikus and follows the daily life of a young hotel employee.

These are just a few of the amazing winners of the 2022 World Illustration Awards, but keep scrolling to see more who made the cut.

Cover illustration for Trajan's 'Shanghairen'



Cover illustration for Trajan’s ‘Shanghairen’

The Lighthouse Keeper by Chencorn



The Lighthouse Keeper by Chencorn

Climate change by Christian Gralingen



Climate change by Christian Gralingen

Scales and Shards by Soojin Kim



Scales and Shards by Soojin Kim

Mobile dollhouse by Vyolet Jin Coralie



Mobile dollhouse by Vyolet Jin Coralie

Forest for us by Iga Nawara



Forest for us by Iga Nawara

Health for All by Lea Berndorfer



Health for All by Lea Berndorfer

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